Holt adoption baby

sell by 12/19/66

Archive for October 2008

The Lie We Love

leave a comment »

from Foreign Policy
The full article (which is excellent, btw) is only available to FP subscribers. A short excerpt is provided here for your reference. Click here to go to the original source where you can log on or purchase Archive access to read the full story.
also click on the photo essay
The Lie We Love
By E. J. Graff
November/December 2008

ALEXANDER MARTINEZ/AFP/Getty Images
Who’s your mommy?: Parents might never know if their adopted child is truly an orphan.

Web Extra: For a photographic tour of the global baby trade, visit: ForeignPolicy.com/extras/adoption.

We all know the story of international adoption: Millions of infants and toddlers have been abandoned or orphaned—placed on the side of a road or on the doorstep of a church, or left parentless due to AIDS, destitution, or war. These little ones find themselves forgotten, living in crowded orphanages or ending up on the streets, facing an uncertain future of misery and neglect. But, if they are lucky, adoring new moms and dads from faraway lands whisk them away for a chance at a better life.

Unfortunately, this story is largely fiction.

Westerners have been sold the myth of a world orphan crisis. We are told that millions of children are waiting for their “forever families” to rescue them from lives of abandonment and abuse. But many of the infants and toddlers being adopted by Western parents today are not orphans at all. Yes, hundreds of thousands of children around the world do need loving homes. But more often than not, the neediest children are sick, disabled, traumatized, or older than 5. They are not the healthy babies that, quite understandably, most Westerners hope to adopt. There are simply not enough healthy,…

Written by girl4708

October 30, 2008 at 4:30 am

Posted in Winds of Change

Tagged with

Some are more enlightened than others

leave a comment »

foster sisters reunited – and they can still speak Korean!

so nice they only had to wait 6 months instead of 40 years.

(apologies for the Barry Manilow)

Written by girl4708

October 26, 2008 at 2:44 am

Posted in Reunions

Tagged with ,

Going Home

leave a comment »

Written by girl4708

October 26, 2008 at 2:01 am

Posted in Reunions

Tagged with ,

Latest Letter to Holt

leave a comment »

Steve Kalb of Holt International,

I entered into this search process not unlike most every other adoptee, naively thinking Holt would help me out as stated on your website.  However, this process, though friendly, has been continuously frustrated by your methods.

The body of this letter has been removed since Holt has decided to DO THE RIGHT THING and assist me.

I would like to close my dealings with your organization on a positive note.  Please give me reason to do so.

I’m glad Holt chose to do the right thing and fully explore every available avenue of reunion.  I hope it is based on conscience and not becuase of public disclosure.  Fully exploring every available avenue of reunion should be the first response, instead of the last resort after a long arduous triage. I hope this is a new beginning for Holt, and that future adoptees in search benefit from our difficult relationship.

Written by girl4708

October 21, 2008 at 2:12 am

Posted in Dealing with the Devil

Tagged with ,

Getting Ready for Korea

leave a comment »

After the adoption file stonewalling I decided I needed to go to Korea and investigate my history on foot.  By some strange twist of fate, our economy just happened to tank at the same time.  Because my profession (architecture) is on the front line of the market battle, it has been one of the first industry’s hit.  And hard.  The writing is on the wall, the work has been slowing, and looking around I see a reduction in jobs and workforce.  I am essentially over-qualified and too old to be hired for the few jobs available in my area.  So what the hell.  I might as well get to REALLY know my culture.

My investments disappeared and I have been essentially laid off. I think the gods are trying to tell me something – don’t wait – go now.  I don’t understand the forced urgency about this, but I will embrace it and try to have the adventure of my life.  And who knows?  It may instead be coming home to the land of the morning calm.

Talking to one job recruiter, he kept complementing me on how I had done my homework.  Well, I have never been one to hoard my lessons, so I have assembled my most valuable resources (replace my college transcripts for your institutions, however!) so should you, too, wish to return you can have one clearinghouse spot from which to gather the information you need specifically for Korean Adoptees seeking to teach english in Korea.

Enjoy, and the links are assembled in this Getting Ready for Korea jetpack.

(It is Washington State focused right now, but I will be sure to update it into a more general resource after I have completed my document gathering)

Written by girl4708

October 19, 2008 at 3:16 am

Posted in Scattered Seeds

Tagged with

The Han of Being Kyopo -or- Korean, interrupted…

leave a comment »

I’m taking a crash course in Korean. Han is not one of the words on my vocabulary list, but I’ve known Han all my life.

Han

from Wikipedia

The Korean poet Ko Eun describes the trait as universal to the Korean experience: “We Koreans were born from the womb of Han and brought up in the womb of Han.”[3] Han connotes both despair at recognition of past injustice and acceptance of such matters as part of the Korean experience.

The Television show The West Wing also referenced the trait in Episode 5.4 (entitled “Han“). The episode concludes with Bartlet, the President of the United States, realizing his own personal understanding of the esoteric concept; “There is no literal English translation. It’s a state of mind. Of soul, really. A sadness. A sadness so deep no tears will come. And yet still there’s hope.”

As part of the Korean Diaspora, the over 160,000 children sent abroad for adoption, it is natural that we, too, carry Han with us, deep in our souls.

Recently on the K@W (Korean Adoptees Worldwide) board was the following post:

The words Kyopo <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korean_diaspora> and Dongpo
are general terms that refer to Korean-blooded people who’ve lived the
majority of their life outside of Korea. The “literal” meaning of Kyopo is
derived from the Chinese characters “KYO” – meaning vagabond or wanderer and
“PO”-meaning placenta where one can translate this to “leaving the mother’s
womb”

The Kyopo adoptee, therefore, was born in the womb of Han, forced to leave the mother’s womb and sent abroad as vagabonds and wanderers.

Han has been, for me, like the kryptonite fears of Superman. Again, from wikipedia:

When Superman followed the time trail of a piece of red rock that weakened him, he was able to trace his origin back to Krypton for the first time

Soon I will return to my mother country. Soon I will learn what it is to live literally in the womb of Han. This kryptonite that handicaps me here in the United States – will it be my source of strength in Korea? Is it the key unlocking my origins, my sense of place, my identity?

I always thought of Korea as a coarse place, a rugged, inhospitable place. In all things, it seemed less refined aesthetically than Japan; less diverse than China. I would look at photos of Korea in the Lands and People geography encyclopedia of my youth and be disappointed it wasn’t as cultural as Japan or as historically rich as China. But now. Now I am beginning to think of Korea differently.

Just their word for greeting, for instance, is so civil, has such depth and meaning: annyeonghaseyo, which translates literaly to, “are you at peace?” I am beginning to appreciate the rough-hewn nature of their aesthetics, which are boueyed by an esoteric sensibility forged from persisting against all odds. There is nobility and beauty there. That, despite fighting off continuous attack and colonization by marauding hoards throughout history, being almost continuously on the defense in a state of seige, they choose to greet one another with, “are you at peace?”

It’s a profound question, a good question, one that instantly makes me care about those I am sharing this troubled Korean experience with.

I have hope.

Written by girl4708

October 19, 2008 at 2:31 am

Posted in Scattered Seeds

Tagged with

Korea Aims to End Stigma of Adoption

leave a comment »

from the New York Times

Kim Chang-shik, left, and his wife, Yoon Yeo-rim, of Seoul adopted their daughter, Kim Ih-rin, top right, after first having a son, Kim Shi-eon.

Kim Chang-shik, left, and his wife, Yoon Yeo-rim, of Seoul adopted their daughter, Kim Ih-rin, top right, after first having a son, Kim Shi-eon.

Published: October 8, 2008
SEOUL, South Korea — Daunted by the stigma surrounding adoption here, Cho Joong-bae and Kim In-soon delayed expanding their family for years. When they finally did six years ago, Mr. Cho chose to tell his elderly parents that the child was the result of an affair, rather than admit she was adopted.
Read the rest of the story here.
Phasing out international adoption in four years is the answer to my prayers. And I would argue against most international adoptees being happy about being adopted. Most feel some sense of loss, and most have not been exposed to the dark history of how our favorite adoption agency and those that followed in their footsteps conducted BUSINESS. I hope all the rest of Holt’s participating countries see the light soon.

Written by girl4708

October 9, 2008 at 10:58 pm

Posted in Winds of Change

Tagged with

Grandma Holt, why would you let people like this adopt?

with 2 comments

I wrote about my mother in my personal blog, but its subject matter crosses over into Holt territory, so I am linking to it here.

Added:

Man, that ceramic figurine on the record table is such a trigger…My dad used to always point it out, touch me a little too sweetly on the head, and say, “you know you’re my little Siamese kitty kat!”

Didn’t he see the cloud pass over my face as I shrank from his touch and thought, “I’m not Siamese.  I’m not your kitty kat.  I’m Korean.  Whatever that is.”

Written by girl4708

October 7, 2008 at 4:41 am

Posted in Saving Babies for Jesus

Tagged with ,

Are You My Mother?

leave a comment »

Something changes when you grow up:  you start forming your own opinions.  And those opinions change as you become more exposed to the world and experience a life beyond the one your parents presented to you.

Many of us adoptees had parents who were unsympathetic to the plight of our birth mothers.  While they may not have denigrated the person who gave birth to us, many chose to elevate their own image in our eyes by placing our mother’s image in frame of poor life choices, a frame of western christian moralistic black and white values.  So our mothers were either dead or selfish strumpets with poor coping skills.  What they failed to tell us about were the lack of options available in Korea, and as further investigation reveals, many of these women were targeted and coerced by Holt to relinquish their children in the name of saving souls and to feed a market which they had created.  A market which not only exploited the vulnerability of women in temporary distress, but which also took lost children, not even bothering to look for their parents, and called them orphans.  A market which falsified the ages and identities of hundreds of thousands of children to make them more adoptable.  The adoption agenices created missing and exploited children, selling them abroad as orphans – even though they had families that loved them.

So now we are all grown up.  Some of us have lived through temporary distress.  Some of us have experienced the vulnerability of our pregnancies.  Some of us have felt the sting of making bad choices based on a lack of options.  How can we vilify these women now?  How can we have anything but sympathy for the pain they must have felt, the pain they still feel?

It took forty years to cast aside my callous armor and see my mother as a person in her own right, and not just as the bad person who rejected me.  I must search for her before it is too late.  And tell her:

I see you

Below are some registries to aid in the search.

Find Parents

(i had some trouble with their form and navigation – I emailed them and asked them to register me)

GAIPS

All in Korean so impossible for me to maneuver – but I think a lot of Korean parents in search come here. Jane Jeong Trenka has been translating some of these recently, as a public service.

GOAL

Has a Korean Families Searching Database, and supposedly an adoptee registry.  But I’m not seeing how it works.

Holt Babies

All of the above bother me in their useability, so I created my own.  The thinking was it could be like Classmates.com, only Holt Adoptees.  It has a before/after photo component to it, and I’m asking everyone that if they put in any search information on themselves, that they put it through a machine translation so Korean parents can read it.  By making it fun for us adoptees (the then and now photo thing) and because people don’t necessarily have to be in search to participate, I’m hoping we will get a bigger population amassed than on the search registries.  By the time a large body is assembled, it will be easy to market this in Korea.  I figure the more exposure we get, the better, and one more registry can’t hurt our odds.

Human Find

Written by girl4708

October 5, 2008 at 10:23 am

Posted in Tools for Searching

Tagged with

NEWSFLASH – NO MORE KOREAN ADOPTIONS!!!

with 2 comments

from Holt International’s website:

As of October 1st, 2008, applications will only be accepted from families open to a child with special needs, Holt Korea Alumni families, and Korean-American families (including Holt Korean adoptees). The Korean government generally requires Holt to work directly with prospective parents. Holt can place Korean children in the following states: Arkansas, California, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, Oregon, South Dakota and Texas.Holt may place waiting Korean children with special needs (or healthy children to Korean-American parents) in the following States: Alabama, Arizona, Colorado, Hawaii, Kentucky, Minnesota, Mississippi, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Washington DC, West Virginia and Wyoming.

Now, is it going to take another decade before the backlash from the grown up adoptees from all the other countries they mine for babies before they get out of the international adoption business???  Or is it going to take more children being murdered by poorly screened adoptive parents to make the countries of origin begin to think about the better, brighter life they are sending their children to?

God, it would be wonderful if this website didn’t need to exist…

Written by girl4708

October 4, 2008 at 8:26 pm

Posted in Winds of Change

Tagged with

Some Repatriate

leave a comment »

Here are a list of resources for those interested in doing so.  The List will be continually added to, so do revisit.

OAKS:  Overseas Adopted Koreans

Written by girl4708

October 4, 2008 at 8:17 pm

Posted in Scattered Seeds

Tagged with

List of Korean Orphanages

leave a comment »

While the focus of the website linked below is to glorify the post war efforts to find homes for Korean orphans, it has gathered some interesting links which may be informative for adoptees in search.

This particular page lists most of the over 400 orphanages in post-war Korea. If you know the name of the orphanage you came from and it is listed, you can type in its name and it will bring up whatever information they have gathered on it.

While Holt had its main orphanage, many of the children brought there for international adoption were first in other orphanages, or Holt arranged for international adoption directly from the orphanages they were staying at. It was not until much later that they emphasized foster care. I will update this generalization with the actual figures and dates as I locate them again.

The List is here

I just wanted to add what an interesting, interesting website this is.  Even though the “Korean conflict” was a decade before my time, many of the orphanages were of course established at that time.  By typing in my city of origin, I was able to uncover the names of three orphanages in that area.

Hope you can make use of this information in your search.

Written by girl4708

October 4, 2008 at 7:31 pm

Posted in Tools for Searching

Tagged with

Adoption foundation founder now supports unwed moms

leave a comment »

Written by girl4708

October 4, 2008 at 7:08 pm

Posted in Winds of Change

Tagged with ,

Adoption in Korean Media (I will keep adding to this)

leave a comment »

Can you go with me to see my mom?

Written by girl4708

October 4, 2008 at 6:11 pm

Posted in Winds of Change

Tagged with ,

Children’s Day in Korea

leave a comment »

Adoptees Install Public Art to illustrate the loss of Korea’s children to adoption

(the adoptees speak in English about their project halfway through the video)

Written by girl4708

October 4, 2008 at 5:23 pm

Posted in Winds of Change

Tagged with ,

Sunny Jo beats the devil at his own game

leave a comment »

Sunny Jo encountered the same kind of deflecting and stone-walling from Holt that every other Korean adoptee encounters.  I wish I had written my “Be Tenacious:  How to get your identity back” article for her back then.

Persistence, my KAD brothers and sisters.

Read Sunny Jo’s story here

Here’s her website

I think I’m following in the same tradition.  Only there are thousands of us now.  Our voices must unite.

Written by girl4708

October 2, 2008 at 6:20 pm

Posted in Dealing with the Devil

Tagged with ,

Adoptees Perceptions of International Adoption

leave a comment »

take a moment to read the amazing Evan P. Donaldson Adoption Institute

survey of

The Gathering of the First Generation
of Adult Korean Adoptees:
Adoptees’ Perceptions of International Adoption

Written by girl4708

October 2, 2008 at 5:52 pm

Posted in Scattered Seeds

Tagged with